A Step Closer to the Mysterious Origin of the Viking Sword Ulfberht | Ancient Origins

http://www.ancient-origins.net/artifacts-ancient-technology/step-closer-mysterious-origin-viking-sword-ulfberht-002455

Mind boggling and intriguing! If you enjoyed my post on the Smith in Irish mythology, and Dan’s post on the Celtic forge and metalworking techniques, you’re going to love this article about the mysterious Ulfberht Viking sword!

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2 thoughts on “A Step Closer to the Mysterious Origin of the Viking Sword Ulfberht | Ancient Origins

  1. Generally pretty accurate. But one thing that always makes me chuckle, shake my head and groan is the “how could such primitives have done that without modern tech” sentiment that is invariably contained in such articles. (See my comments on this mentality here: http://www.celticclans.org/re-livinghistory/?p=747)

    Although the Ulfbert swords were rare and prized none of the techniques were unheard of (eg a pattern welded core surrounded by a steel cutting edge) and were practiced by a variety of smiths (including some Celtic) throughout the ages. That blacksmith Richard Furrer found the creation of one “the most complicated thing he’d ever made” is not surprising. If I remember the Nova special correctly he (like myself) is a general blacksmith and he made his own crucible steel too; not something many general smiths do! But I know other swordsmiths for whom this is a matter of course, and this would have been standard practice for most smiths of the Viking era.

    So remember we’re “wow’ed” by this because *we’ve* forgotten how to do it. For Ulfbert, it was just another day at the forge.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have read your post before, and completely agree with you! But I am still ‘wowed’ by it all! I am amazed by anyone who can make something out of what seems to be nothing, whether its a blacksmith obtaining shining metal from a rock, or an artist painting a picture, a musician composing, or even today, a builder building a house, a carpenter making a piece of furniture. There is most definitely something magical about the work of the craftsman/ woman to the uninitiated like me, even though I know there is logic and knowledge and skill that went into creating it, rather than spells, lol!

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