About Ali

I am a (mature) student of English, and Irish History at Maynooth University, as well as an author of fiction and non-fiction, and a blogger.

I am fascinated by Ireland’s magical ancient heritage, and my writing is inspired by that, and also by my twelve year old daughter, Carys, who was born with Cardiofaciocutaneous Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder.

Please forgive me if I go off the main topic every now and again, and blog about my life with Carys… sometimes, it can get overwhelming, and writing about my experiences helps.

My life is hectic and eclectic; full time study, looking after my busy sporty young family and all that entails, as well as my crazy mutt-hound, Indi(ana Bones), lots of driving, and trying to keep my blog updated whilst I work on my books… life is never dull!

In the midst of all that, I try to get out into the countryside as much as possible, which is essential not only for my sanity, but also to bring you photos, videos, and tall tales of the characters and mythologies which are entwined as much with Ireland’s psyche, as its landscape.


thank you for visiting

57 Comments on “About Ali

  1. i share your enthusiasm for a lost past, a sense of who we are, in this crazy world, my father is descended from dainish vikings, my mother was romany, romani, maiden name whitby, im related to the o briens ( breen ) and the o neills, and of course a tolkien fan, so thank you for reminding us, of who we are, and not, as modern history tells us, we should be

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    • What an interesting heritage you have, Wolfroy! The O’Briens and the O’Neills were both prominent dynasties in Ireland’s history. I am a Tolkien fan too, but not as much as my husband… he is a real Tolkien aficionado!☺ Thank you for getting in touch, it’s nice to get to know you. And I’m delighted to hear you enjoy the blog.

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  2. Cara Ali, your site is awesome and it reminds me of my Kaiako (Tutor), she is Irish and has encouraged the growth of my Celtic side, at present I’m involved in indigenous studies and would love to know more about the social values of the Celtic (Irish) communities.
    Beannacht leat,
    Alex

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi Alex, thank you for getting in touch. Glad you like the blog, that is music to my ears. 😊 I’m guessing you must have Irish Heritage. I am a student myself, and I guess I am also trying to develop my inner Celt! πŸ˜‚ Nice to meet you! 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Pleased to find you Ali – looking forwrd to looking over your blog and your books and meeting you at the bash!

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    • Thank you Nerissa! That’s such a lovely thing to say. 😊 We must always keep striving. I don’t think we’d achieve anything if we didn’t have a dream to reach for. Thank you for following.

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  4. I always wanted a chopper bike, but I did love my Raleigh πŸ™‚ I’m fascinated by your many languages too. What an amazing gift πŸ™‚ My half-Irish dad told me stories all the time as a girl, and I now love to do the same, ever searching like you for that distant past, weaving stories into the present, giving hope for the future. I am so glad to meet you dear Ali! Sherri xxx

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    • Hi Sherri, I’m sorry but I somehow missed your comment! Unfortunately, most of the languages have drifted into the ether, never having been used beyond childhood, and now I no longer seem to have the same aptitude… or memory! So glad to have met you too!

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      • Hi Ali, and no worries! I’ve just discovered a few I missed on a post and have no idea what happened. And yes, that is the way of things isn’t it? I know it’s not the same thing, although a sort of a language, but I used to use shorthand for everything in my job as a PA, minutes of meetings the lot, then decipher it back and type it all out. I can’t even imagine doing that now, no way. In fact, I can’t believe I ever did!!!

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  5. Lovely to meet you here and I look forward to seeing you in the flesh at the bloggers bash!! πŸ™‚ Your bio has intrigued me and I shall explore some of your posts after work.
    See you Saturday!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I’ve just been nominated for the ‘Amazing Blogger Award’ and in turn would like to nominate you for your wonderful Blog site. The choice is entirely yours if you accept the award or not. Should you wish to proceed, further details can be found on my post I’ll publish later tonight.

    Liked by 1 person

        • Hmmmm… good old fb isnt showing me your comment yet, but you got me intrigued! I haven’t heard of that film, but perhaps its on youtube. I’ll check it out. They definitely are fascinating for sure, although it really irritates me when experts rush to the conclusion that something must be ‘ritual’ without proper evidence to back it up. Gruesome injuries are not proof. But it does grab media support, appeal to the macabre sensitivities of the general public, and perhaps lead indirectly to futher funding. What… me, cynical?!!

          Liked by 1 person

          • You cynical? Never! But we just met! πŸ™‚ I believe that due to the significance of the elemtents or earth, wind, water and fire, the sites, usually borderlands, and the fact that bogs were neither solid earth or liquid water meant that the spirits of those killed were trapped in a no man’s land, well a celtic no man’s land. And I think it might have been a punishment/revenge for crimes. So that’s my theory. The book I wrote is called Mona The Body in the Bog. And The Perfect Corpse is on Youtube.

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            • Fab, thanks. I will leave a review for yours on Amazon.com. There’s a festival in County Galway, The Shorelines Arts Festival in Portumna. You might want to contact the organizers and see if you could speak at the literary brunch next year. It is on this year from Sept 18-21. Great exposure for up and coming writers.

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  7. Dia duit mo chara! I just bought your book on Amazon and I’m looking forward to an enjoyable evening with Conor. πŸ™‚

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  8. Good morning. I came across your blog through a reference to a post on Ogham, and let me say how very glad I am I read that post, as it took me to your post on Ogham. I read it, and I know I, a big fan of Irish mythology (of which I use in my own writing) will be spending a lot of time on your blog. πŸ™‚

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    • Thats funny! I was thinking the exact same thing about you! Nice to meet you too and thanks for stopping by my blog.

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  9. What a great find. . . finding your blog here, am excited to dig in and read more of it. I loved your comment on Laurie Buchanan’s blog today, which prompted me to come visit – well, that and the fact that I am half Irish:)

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    • Another Alison…hi! Nice to meet you and thanks for your lovely comments. I hope you find something you like here. Please feel free to comment as much as you like! I welcome opinions, questions and discussion! Its a great way to make new friends with similar interests. We are very lucky to live in the digital age! Laurie’s posts always get you thinking, don’t they? She makes me surprise myself sometimes lol!

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