aliisaacstoryteller

Dún Dealgan, Home of Cuchulainn

Dún Dealgan means ‘the stronghold of Dalgan’ in Irish. According to legend, long before it became the home of Ulster’s hero, Cuchulainn, it was originally the site of a fortress constructed by a Fir Bolg chieftain by the name of Delga.

Of Heroes and Giants

The mighty Proleek Dolmen is a portal tomb which dates from around 3000BC, and which lies in the heart of Cuchullain country. However, this iconic monument is associated with another hero of Irish mythology, the giant, Fionn mac Cumhail. The  ‘Giant’s Table’ is another name for the dolmen, which actually comes from a Breton word ‘tolmen’ which means ‘stone table’.

The Visitor Centre at Emain Macha. www.aliisaacstoryteller.com

Emain Macha, Stronghold of Ulster Kings or Site of Sacred Ritual?

EMAIN MACHA, also known by the name of Navan Fort, is real and still standing today, and like the Hill of Tara, and Cruachan, is open to the general public to access, free of charge.

Macha, Warrior-Queen or Sovereignty Goddess?

Returning to the raison d’etre of this blog, and to Incredible Irish Women in particular (most apt in light of recent happenings in this country), I’d like to introduce you to MACHA. There are several women by the… Read More

the virgin births of irish myth

Jesus and Mary weren’t the first; throughout history, exceptional men around the world were said to have been born of virgin mothers. It’s still going on today: forty five women claimed to be virgin mothers in the US in recent years. And of course, Irish mythology is as rife with tales of virgin births as it is with stories of sex, violence, and tragic romance.

Peculiar Pregnancies in Irish Mythology

Being a woman of a certain age, and a mother, I was wondering what it must have been like to be pregnant in ancient Ireland, so I decided to do some digging, and guess what? There’s hardly anything… Read More