aliisaacstoryteller

Speaking in Tongues of Fire

Today, satire refers to biting, snarky incendiary sarcasm, often humorous, generally aimed at politicians and people of power. But to the ancient Irish, whose society was founded on a code of honour, satire had a much darker, and more practical purpose. To compose a satire against someone was to challenge their authority and call their honour into question. There could be no greater shame.

Imbas Forosnai | Poetic Inspiration of the Irish Filidh

This act of looking into the future and chanting or reciting prophecy in the form of poetry is called Imbas Forosnai (imbas meaning ‘inspiration’, in particular the sacred poetic inspiration of the ancient Filidh, and forosnai meaning ‘illuminating’ or ‘that which illuminates’).

Seanchai | The Irish Storyteller

In keeping with my newly restored fascination with the poetic, I have re-blogged an older post about the Irish Seanchai (storytellers) and Fílí (poets). On Friday, I will be discussing Irish poetic inspiration. On my first ever trip… Read More

Seanchai – The Irish Storyteller

  On my first ever trip to Ireland, I remember strolling along the banks of the River Liffey with my now husband, when we encountered a group of skateboarders harassing an old man sitting on a bench. At least,… Read More