Incredible Irish Women | Saint Dympna

Incredible Irish Women | Saint Dympna

Today I visited the shrine of Saint Dympna in a tiny little place called Lavey in Co. Cavan. Although Dympma is quite a well-known seventh century saint in Ireland, her association with Lavey is a relatively unknown local… Read More

More on Fore, Holy Site of the Seven Wonders

A few weeks ago, I wrote a short piece about my visit to Fore, an ancient monastic site with a long and varied history stretching right back into the seventh century AD. I’m not normally a fan of… Read More

The Curious Phenomenon of the Irish Fairy Tree

In Ireland, we take our fairy trees, our fairy tales, and our fairy folk for that matter, quite seriously. So seriously, in fact, that we delay the building of a motorway by ten years, and then end up completely re-routing it so that we avoid harming a well-known fairy tree.

Corcomroe Abbey, The Wild Atlantic Way.

Corcomroe Abbey | The Wild Atlantic Way

We finished our hike through the Burren at Corcomroe Abbey. It was wonderful to get our boots off, then wander round this peaceful ancient monastic site located in such a lush green valley with the evening sun gleaming… Read More

The Cliffs of Moher and the Wild Atlantic Way

My lovely friend Jenni and I decided to walk a section of the Burren Way, which in turn forms part of the Wild Atlantic Way. Honestly, the lengths one has to go to, just to get some child-and-husband-free… Read More

Irish Mythology | Cor Deiseal, the Sunwise Ritual

The ancient Irish and Celtic peoples were incredibly knowledgeable with regard to the skies and celestial bodies, and we know that their calendar was divided not just by the seasons, but by the movements of the sun, stars and earth. Cor Deiseal, (pronounced kor dy-ash-al) comes from the words deis meaning ‘right-hand’ and deas meaning ‘south’. It refers to the curious movement, or procession, in a clockwise direction, thus following the course of the sun.