aliisaacstoryteller

Processional Pathways of Ancient Ireland

In October 2015, I had a very strange experience at Tlachtga, the Hill of Ward. As I walked the site, I became increasingly dizzy and developed a powerful headache. Half an hour after driving away from the site,… Read More

Speaking in Tongues of Fire

Today, satire refers to biting, snarky incendiary sarcasm, often humorous, generally aimed at politicians and people of power. But to the ancient Irish, whose society was founded on a code of honour, satire had a much darker, and more practical purpose. To compose a satire against someone was to challenge their authority and call their honour into question. There could be no greater shame.

A Fire in the Head | Shamanic Use of Amanita in Irish Mythology

The Irish called it Agairg Cuileoige, but it’s more popularly known as Amanita Muscaria. It has been used throughout the ages and around the world for its hallucinogenic properties, usually for religious, shamanic and spiritual purposes. And there are lots of clues in Irish mythology as to its use in ancient Irish culture.

The Aisling | Not so Sweet Dreams in Irish Mythology

In Irish mythology, Óengus Óg is famous for his dream. It changed his life. In fact, it almost killed him. It also went on a long time, a whole year in fact. Do you think it is possible for a dream to have such an effect? Perhaps you think you never dream. Nowadays, we believe that dreams are just the manifestations of an over-active mind attempting to process the events and experiences of our waking moments. In ancient times, however, they were seen as far more significant.