aliisaacstoryteller

Planning Your Visit to Ireland? Stop by a Holy Well

After all, we have plenty of them. Most of our holy wells are nowadays named after famous and beloved Christian saints, mostly Patrick and Bridget, but also some others, too. Personally, I think these were sacred springs long… Read More

Mound of hostages, black and white images, people standing on top of it.

Planning Your Visit to Ireland? Tour 4 Strange and Spooky Sites Associated with #Samhain

The old festivals seem to me to fit perfectly into the cycle of seasons and the passing of the year. And also with the ebb and flow of my blood, or the beating of my heart, or my body clock, whatever you want to call that natural instinctual internal part of oneself. You may try and suppress it, but it’s always still there. If you feel the same, here are some places in Ireland that are associated with Samhain which you might like to visit: Tlachtga, the Mound of Hostages at Tara; Magh Slecht, and Oweynagat.

The ancient oak planks of the great Corlea Trackway.

Planning Your Visit to Ireland? Trek Along the Iron-Age Trackway at Corlea

I love bogs. Not only do they provide us with sweet-smelling turf for burning over the winter, which keeps us so warm and cosy and drowsy, but they hide extraordinary secrets which they allow us to find, now… Read More

Planning Your Visit to Ireland? Sit in the Witches Chair.

The Witches Throne is a huge kebstone carved with armrests at the base of cairn T at the highest point of Loughcrew. It measures  3 m (10 ft) across, and 1.8 m (6 ft) high, and is estimated to weigh in the region of 10 tons. From here, according to local legend, a giant witch known as the cailleach sat and surveyed the extent of her domain. If you are brave enough to sit in her seat, she may grant you a single wish!

Planning Your Visit to Ireland? Walk in the Footsteps of St Féichín at Fore

St Féichín’s Way is a 3km loop walk around the ancient monastic settlement at Fore. It takes in a selection of the historic sites associated with the monastery, as well as areas of natural beauty. Fore comes from the Irish Fhobhair, meaning ‘the town of the water springs’. The monastery was founded there by St Féichín in 630AD, where it is said  there were as many as three hundred monks and two thousand students in residence at any one time, so it was quite a busy and thriving community in its heyday.

Planning your Visit to Ireland? See the Oldest Tree in Ireland.

Most of you will no doubt be aware by now that I have returned to full-time education. Well, I’m about to start my second year, but you can imagine how my ears pricked up during last year’s induction… Read More

Tailtiu, the Church of St Patrick and the Eastern Fort

I started 2017 with a trip to Teltown. It was the morning after the night before, and I looked like it, but I didn’t bring you here just to admire my good looks (ahem); I have something far… Read More

The Stone of the Big Man

I drove past it three times. Eventually, I stopped in the local village shop for a bottle of water and directions. The young woman behind the counter gave me a friendly smile. “We’re always after getting visitors in… Read More

The Truth About Irish Mythology

I learned something devastating last week, and it was not what I wanted to hear. There is no such thing as Irish Mythology. It doesn’t exist. Truth hurts, right? I wanted to crawl into a hole and cry…. Read More