aliisaacstoryteller

I went into the Otherworld… and survived!

My first speaking event, in conjunction with Anthony Murphy of Muthical Ireland, discoverer of Drone Henge, hosted by David Halpin of Circle Stories,

Inside the Cave of Cats.

Inside the ‘Hell-Mouth’ of Ireland (video)

There is a cave at Cruachan. Its small dark mouth yawns at your feet beneath a shroud of hawthorn bushes, and is never lit up by the sun. You can slide your way in, if you dare. The only way is supine on your belly, sinuous as a snake in the thick blackness, or on your back, enclosed so closely that the rock wall brushes your skin as you pass, the weight of the earth pressing on your consciousness, on your lungs, filling you with the fear of rockfalls, of demonic creatures which burst through from the Otherworld, of the terrible Goddess of strife and death we call the Morrigan, of the dread that once inside, you will become trapped, unable to ever return to the surface.

Dún Dealgan, Home of Cuchulainn

Dún Dealgan means ‘the stronghold of Dalgan’ in Irish. According to legend, long before it became the home of Ulster’s hero, Cuchulainn, it was originally the site of a fortress constructed by a Fir Bolg chieftain by the name of Delga.

Of Heroes and Giants

The mighty Proleek Dolmen is a portal tomb which dates from around 3000BC, and which lies in the heart of Cuchullain country. However, this iconic monument is associated with another hero of Irish mythology, the giant, Fionn mac Cumhail. The  ‘Giant’s Table’ is another name for the dolmen, which actually comes from a Breton word ‘tolmen’ which means ‘stone table’.

Lough Sillan, Co. Cavan. www.aliisaacsoryteller.com

Air, Water, Earth and Fire

I needed to get some air. Clear my head. Breathe. Feel the wind ruffle my hair. Listen to the sound of birds, let the slap of water on the shore soothe away my tension. I needed to feel… Read More

Abortion and Birth Control in Ancient Ireland

To listen to the way people talk, you’d think abortion and birth control were a modern phenomenon. Not so. As  John M. Riddle, J. Worth Estes and Josiah C. Russell say in their paper, ‘Birth Control in the… Read More

Processional Pathways of Ancient Ireland

In October 2015, I had a very strange experience at Tlachtga, the Hill of Ward. As I walked the site, I became increasingly dizzy and developed a powerful headache. Half an hour after driving away from the site,… Read More

The Rath of Synods at the Hill of Tara. (c) Ali Isaac

The 5 Great Roads of Ancient Ireland: Fact or Medieval Fiction?

According to legend, there were once five great roads which led to the Hill of Tara. The Annals of the Four Masters claim they magically appeared on the night of King Conaire’s birth. Just a story, or is their any evidence that Ireland really was criss-crossed by these five arterial lines of communication?

The Sovereignty Goddess of Ireland. www.aliisaacstoryteller.com. #sovereignty #goddess #ireland #mythology

The Sovereignty Goddess of Ireland

Following my recent posts on Macha and the site of Emain Macha, it occurred to me that I have referenced, but never really elaborated, on the concept or function of the sovereignty goddess in Irish myth. To be… Read More

The Visitor Centre at Emain Macha. www.aliisaacstoryteller.com

Emain Macha, Stronghold of Ulster Kings or Site of Sacred Ritual?

EMAIN MACHA, also known by the name of Navan Fort, is real and still standing today, and like the Hill of Tara, and Cruachan, is open to the general public to access, free of charge.

Macha, Warrior-Queen or Sovereignty Goddess?

Returning to the raison d’etre of this blog, and to Incredible Irish Women in particular (most apt in light of recent happenings in this country), I’d like to introduce you to MACHA. There are several women by the… Read More

Eithne and Fedelma: ‘Unfinished Business’

You may remember these two young ladies: And you may remember also the block I had when it came to writing the next post in my Incredible Irish Women series, and how I was given to believe that… Read More