aliisaacstoryteller

Poem | Missing the Point

They are dragged up the hill like beads on a rosary, their guide droning, words buzzing in one ear, dripping from the other like honey, to make room for the three other sites they will visit today. They want… Read More

Happy Paddy’s Day!

Here is a modern Irish anthem for the day that’s in it! I couldn’t find you a pretty video of these handsome boys, so the lyrics will have to do… enjoy! Personally, I will be avoiding pubs, parades,… Read More

A Samhain Story | Fionn mac Cumhall and the Sidhe-Prince of Flame

This is the story of the how the boy-warrior, Fionn mac Cumhall, defeated the Fire-fairy, Ailen mac Midhna, who had been laying waste to the royal stronghold of Tara every Samhain for many years, and how he won his rightful place as the leader of the Fianna.

Imbas Forosnai | Poetic Inspiration of the Irish Filidh

This act of looking into the future and chanting or reciting prophecy in the form of poetry is called Imbas Forosnai (imbas meaning ‘inspiration’, in particular the sacred poetic inspiration of the ancient Filidh, and forosnai meaning ‘illuminating’ or ‘that which illuminates’).

Tara | Ancient Seat of the High Kings of Ireland

The Hill of Tara, also known as Teamhair na Ri in Irish, is located on the River Boyne near Navan in County Meath. Along with Newgrange, Tara is probably one of the most famous and most visited ancient… Read More

Geis | The Curse in Irish Mythology

Irish mythology is awash with geisa, almost every hero being afflicted by at least one, if not more. At first glance, they seem little more than a sprinkling of magical spice to add a little extra drama to a story: if the hero violates his geis, he suffers dishonour and maybe even death.

However, a closer look yields a slightly different concept behind the use of the geis in Irish myth and legend. 

Ancient Places | A Poem

What cities lie buried beneath each hill? Monuments born of ancient times, Forgotten and lost but standing still, Neglected, disconnected, these are our crimes. * What histories are etched into ancient stones? Tales decayed with the fall of… Read More

The Power of Water in Irish Mythology

It is generally accepted that in ancient times, our ancestors believed one could access the Otherworld via water. It’s understandable; water’s surface acts as a mirror to reflect the sky, mountains, trees all around them. It looked the… Read More

The Tuatha de Denann | Were they Irish Gods or Aliens?

You can read my latest article, The Tuatha de Denann | Were they Irish Gods or Aliens on Irish Central… if you’re interested! Ali xxx

The Ancient Origins of the Irish Road

I was driving along the R438 on my way from Sneem in Co Kerry to my home in Co Cavan yesterday, when it occurred to me, not for the first time, how very long and curiously straight certain… Read More