aliisaacstoryteller
The Hill of Tara. (c) Ali Isaac

Planning Your Visit to Ireland? Take a Walking Tour of Tara with Treasa

If you are planning your visit to Ireland, I highly recommend one of Treasa’s Walking Tours of Tara. They take about two hours, and must be pre-booked, as there are only thirty places available on each tour. Be dressed for inclement weather… this is Ireland, after all!

lughnasadh, a celebration of fertility?

One of the four ancient Irish pre-Christian festivals, Lughnasadh was celebrated on the night of the full moon midway between the summer solstice and autumn equinox, around August 1st. But was it a celebration of thanksgiving for the harvest, or a remnant of some ancient fertility rite, or a monument to love?

Tailtiu, the Church of St Patrick and the Eastern Fort

Teltown is a vast and complex ancient site of some significance dating to the Iron Age. Features include the remnants of mounds, ring forts, earthen ramparts, artificial lakes, and an ancient roadway, but much of these have been erased from the landscape through the actions of farming over the years.

The Stone of the Big Man

Clochafarmore, or Cloch an Fhir Mhóir in Irish means ‘the stone of the big man’, and is located in the townland of Rathiddy, at Knockbridge, in County Louth. You might be thinking GIANT, and in a way, you’d be right… this particular man was a giant in reputation, if not in physicality. You probably know him as Cuchulainn, legendary hero of Ulster.

Halloween or Samhain?

I recently watched a video on Youtube where the expert in the film kept pronouncing Samhain as it looks… Sam-hain. An easy mistake to make, you might think, and I would agree. But not if you profess yourself… Read More

The Fairy Folk of Ireland

In Ireland, these magical beings are known as ‘the Sidhe’ (prounounced Shee), also the Aos Sí, and Daoine Sídhe, and in Scottish lore, the Sith. They are named after the mounds which dot the Irish landscape, and which are said to lead to their homes below the ground. In folklore, they are often referred to as ‘the Fair Folk’ (hence fairy), or the ‘little people’, which couldn’t be further from the truth. Well. You know what I mean.

Were There Giants in Ancient Ireland?

You might think that Irish mythology is full of giants, what with Fionn building the Giant’s Causeway, and the number of ancient stone monuments named ‘The Giant’s Bed/ Leap/ Grave’, but you’d be wrong. There is, however, a specific reason why giants exist in local Irish folklore.

Manannán’s Land Irish Myths of the Sea

Being a small island, peoples lives have been dominated by the sea. In mythology, the Danann, the Milesians, and various other races came to Ireland from the sea. According to legend, Ireland had two sea deities: Lir, and Manannán mac Lir, which means ‘son of Lir’, or ‘son of the sea’.

The Sacred Rites of Kings

So according to current scholarly thinking on ancient Kingship rights in Ireland, a new King had to shag a white horse, kill it and bathe in a stew made from it whilst eating its flesh. Then, if he… Read More

The Glade #writephoto

I haven’t taken part in many writing challenges recently. Quite honestly, its all been a bit of a struggle for a while, writing and researching for the blog, keeping up with all your lovely blogs and comments, writing… Read More

Uisneach | Ancient Ceremonial Site of the Bealtaine Fires

Originally posted on aliisaacstoryteller:
UISNEACH Ancient Ceremonial Site of the Bealtaine Fires I had very few expectations of The Hill of Uisneach (Cnoc Uisneach in Irish) when I went there for the first time, but as with Shee Mor,…

The Fosterling in Irish Mythology

Ireland has a strange history when it comes to the care of its children. Sometimes, it seems as if they were treated as possessions to be traded rather than flesh and blood to be cherished, our country’s future…. Read More