aliisaacstoryteller

Mythology and Folklore | What’s the Difference?

This was something which confused the hell out of me when I first got into Irish mythology; what’s the difference between mythology and folklore, does it matter, and who cares anyway? They’re just a bunch of old stories,… Read More

Knowth | Legend of a Forgotten Queen

I call Knowth the Forbidden Mound because no one is allowed inside. I’m not sure why this is. From my image below, you can see how safe and unrestricted the passage is. According to the archaeologist, George Eogan,… Read More

The Red Headed Folk

In Irish mythology, the Tuatha de Danann and the Sidhe are described as being tall and beautiful with red or fair hair, pale skin and blue or green eyes. Their appearance played no small part in elevating their status to that of Gods.

So what did we do in Winter before the Christians invented #Christmas?

For our ancestors, the festival of Mid-Winter was an essential period of respite from the harshness of winter. Winter was bleak, a time of hardship, and a struggle for survival. The return of summer’s warmth and plenty was not, for them, guaranteed.

But then something remarkable happened beneath that cruel, cold wing of seemingly eternal shade. The Winter Solstice was the turning point upon which their fortunes hinged. Light triumphed over darkness as the days lengthened and the nights grew shorter. The sun was growing stronger in the sky. It was a sign, a promise of better times to come. And that was something worth celebrating.

The Dagda’s Cauldron in Irish Mythology

Irish mythology tells of four mysterious artefacts the enigmatic Tuatha de Danann brought with them when they invaded Ireland. These items were known collectively as the Four Treasures of Eirean, and consisted of Nuada’s Sword of Light; Lugh’s… Read More

Dealan-Dé | The Butterfly in Irish Mythology

This week, I have had to rescue four five six butterflies from becoming entrapped in my home. Although I have lived in this house seven years now, and keep my doors and windows open all day during summer, I have… Read More

The Power of the Harp in Irish Mythology #stpatricksday

The Irish harp is recognized worldwide as being the Ireland’s national emblem. We see it everywhere, from our pint of Guinness to the flag of Leinster; on our coins, our stamps, our passports. Nowadays, this symbol of ‘Irishness’… Read More

Today is Imbolc, and of course it’s snowing!

Imbolc  is one of four ancient Celtic/ Gaelic festivals, the others being Beltaine, celebrated on May 1st; Lughnasadh, on Aug 1st; and Samhain, held on Nov 1st. Imbolc (pronounced I-molk) falls half way between the winter solstice and… Read More